Monday, January 18, 2016

Sharing Your AncestryDNA Matches List with Other Members


If you're an AncestryDNA (from Ancestry.com) member, did you know that you can share your DNA MATCHES list (and full Ethnicity Estimate results) with other AncestryDNA members? And you can do it without giving up your log-in information? Chances are you didn't know, but that's cool. It's a real simple process and I'm going to show you how to do it.

BUT BEFORE YOU SHARE:

  • Deciding to share your AncestryDNA matches with another Ancestry member either means you're a serious genealogist, very liberal-minded, have nothing to hide, or just wants someone else to do all the work for you (which case can be a blessing to some of us). In any case you must be comfortable with sharing your DNA MATCHES list. 
  •  If you share your DNA MATCHES list with another AncestryDNA member, it means this AncestryDNA member can see your list of DNA matches. 
  • You must receive a sharing invite from an AncestryDNA member in order to see that person's results. You don't automatically see their results when you share with them.
  • None of your personal or account information will be shared with the AncestryDNA member(s) viewing your results.
  • Nor will the AncestryDNA member be able to make changes to or hostilely take over your account, raw data, ethnicity estimate, family trees or DNA MATCHES list.
  • You can stop sharing your DNA MATCHES with other members at any time.
  • Relax. If you've uploaded your DNA results to GEDmatch.com then you can see the DNA matches of any kit on your own list. Nothing has happened, right?
  • Sharing your DNA MATCHES works the same way as inviting someone to view your  Ancestry.com's Family Trees -- you invite AncestryDNA members to view your list by sending them a request by username or e-mail address
  • You are the Administrator of your AncestryDNA account. You can ONLY invite another member in the role of "Guest" (invitee limited to viewing your DNA matches list) OR "Editor" (invitee can write/edit notes and "star" your DNA matches) as explained in this screen-shot:
Source: AncestryDNA

HOW TO SHARE YOUR DNA MATCHES LIST: 

(1) On your AncestryDNA Home page go to "SETTINGS" icon as seen here:


(2) Toward the bottom of your "Test Setting for..." page, you will see an "Invite others to access DNA results" button as shown here:  


(3) Once the "Invite others to access DNA results" page opens, you must: 
  • put invitee's username or e-mail address in the "Email or Ancesty username" field;
  • decide which role you want the invitee to have by choosing "Guest" (invitee can view your list only) or "Editor" (invitee can write/edit notes and star your matches) as shown here:

(4) After you've invited the member to view your DNA matches, AncestryDNA will send the member an e-mail to view your results. Once the Ancestry member accepts your invite he or she will be able to see your DNA MATCHES list (and full Ethnicity Estimate). 

  • NOTE: If you're the recipient of an invite to share DNA matches (and you accept), then the AncestryDNA member's  kit name will appear in your "VIEW ANOTHER TEST" drop-down menu. To demonstrate, in the screen-shot below I [prevously] invited my [twin kit] KingGenome to share so the kit name appears on the drop-down list:

  • If I click on my "KingGenome" kit, then it takes me to [my twin kit] King Genome's list of DNA matches, which I can happily explore: 
  
Good will hunting!
#End#


4 comments:

  1. What if we know ancestrys ethnic results and ethnic percentages results are incomplete and in error?? For those told they were 100 % of any regional or ethnic group will find on further testing and entering ones raw data to gedmatch. Com will one get a more accurate view of ones ethnic persusion.. Only after further research into ones dna results did I discover that dna hapalog X2b is is in acculality a proven native American hapalog found
    mainly in Miq'Mak Indians and Druze populations in the middle East..after told 100 % European did I discover I was in fact (toldaschild) Native American.. With family members in Cherokee, Choctaw, creek and Chickasaw.. Strong Cherokee roots including well known chiefs and warriors in family..at least 2 or 3 cousins who told me had no NATIVE AMERICAN blood entered their raw data to gedmatch at my urging based on genealogical research found that they indeed posess small amounts from native american ancestors I had been telling them about..levels are low in us as sometimes 10 generations ago?? At least 6 generations since our families were intertwined between NATIVE AMERICAN families and settler families especially in known Native American territories(east Texas) among the southern united states..research your results !!c

    ReplyDelete
  2. X2a is Native American ... X2b is found in Europe, North Africa and the Near East.

    ReplyDelete
  3. X2b is found in Miq'Mak and Druze populations..David l holt, Cherokee mounted rifles ggggrandad, George Lowery, John Jolly, John Rogers ggggrandads going back to chief moytoy and thomas carpenter who is on gedmatch matchs list..many Cherokee families on my gedmatch list..

    ReplyDelete
  4. Bart Eason, what do you think about this recent blog discussing X2a:
    http://dna-explained.com/2016/01/28/native-american-haplogroup-x2a-solutrean-hebrew-or-beringian/

    ReplyDelete